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Name: Uros Nesic M.Arch, Igor Kozic M.Arch
Age: 26 and 25
Job: Founders of EDiT – visualization studio
Country: Belgrade, Serbia
Website: www.edit.rs
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3DA: How did you start working in 3D field? How much time has passed and what kind of studies did you do?
U&I: We became interested in 3D visualization during our Architecture studies at the University of Belgrade. When you want to present your work in the best way possible you have to go beyond drawings and sketches. In that sense modeling is a very useful tool, and we gradually started going down that path during our studies. So, it was a slow and a rather spontaneous process that involved a lot of different things besides arch.viz. It took a lot of experimenting, twisted nerves, and thinking about and beyond the design that made us who we are now. Visuals make a connection between the viewer and the design on a totally different scale. The drawing gives information about a building, but a picture tells a story about life that goes on in it. Program and stories are what makes projects come to life, and so we like to say that it is important to imagine a home, not a house.

Edit interviewed for www.3darchitettura.com

3DA: Which are your favorite software and plugins for your daily projects?
U&I: We usually work between different platforms depending on the job at hand. It is well known in the arch.viz community that every software has its flaws and advantages. In our case, one thing is sure, every visual finds its way to PS sooner or later, it is where we do most of our work and where we get a chance to take a stand – form our own style. Model and base render are the backbones of every visual, they must be neat and accurate, but it’s the post process that makes the image speak on its own.

Edit interviewed for www.3darchitettura.com

3DA: Tell us something about a project that gave you great satisfactions
U&I: As you gain experience you realize that the most satisfying projects are the ones where you have more freedom to express yourself. It doesn’t have much to do with the scale of the project, as much as it has to do with that feeling you get when a client trusts you enough to give you just the basic guidelines, and lets you come up with the rest. We recently did one job for “0 to 1 studio” in New York that gave us that kind of freedom.

Edit interviewed for www.3darchitettura.com

3DA: From where do you take inspiration for your artworks?
U&I: Inspiration for a particular artwork mostly comes from within itself, the context, the purpose, the character. When you combine those factors with your own personal aspirations at that particular moment you get a sense of the direction in which the image should be going. 

Edit interviewed for www.3darchitettura.com

3DA: How do you live this period of economic crisis? How is it in your country?
U&I: We formed our studio last year, so you could even say that “we were born in the darkness, molded by it”. All jokes aside, starting a studio in this period is probably the best and the worst idea at the same time. It takes a lot of effort and patience, and as time goes by you get uncertain of the choices you made as you step deeper into unknown grounds… and who can wait in times like these, right? But, eventually when it does pay of, one way or the other, it makes all the difference.

Edit interviewed for www.3darchitettura.com

3DA: What would you suggest to people that are approaching to 3D and architecture?
U&I: We are a young aspiring studio, our time is yet to come, and we do not consider ourselves to be in the position to give out advice. We can only share some of our own philosophy with others: have faith, make mistakes, work hard, don’t overwork, experiment, make music, read, photograph, stumble, edit, repeat. 

Edit interviewed for www.3darchitettura.com

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